Diasporans eager to invest in energy sector Hydronax chief executive Ms Victoria Walker who is based in the United Kingdom said the diaspora community must come together and change Africa as the trusted sustainability partner creating valued, single-sourced, efficient energy solutions delivered with passion, expertise, teamwork and relentless focus on high quality.

Trust Freddy-Herald Correspondent

The diaspora community has expressed readiness to invest back home using renewable energy to ameliorate the electricity deficit. 

A proposal has already been put in motion to set up a 100MW solar plant and additional 20MW hydrogen generator which will see 120MW being fed into the grid. 

The hydrogen generator is now seen as the cheapest green storage solution for solar energy; when the sun shines the generated solar power is used to electrolyse water with the hydrogen being stored, and then when there is no sun the hydrogen is used to run a gas generator to provide electricity.

There is zero carbon emission and high levels of efficiency.

Dr Hilton Mabhurukwa, a UK-based Zimbabwean, is already in the country for the purpose of engaging key stakeholders and do multiple site visits in preparation of setting up the double power plant.

Yesterday, Hydronax hosted a pre-feasibility study conference in Harare which was attended by Environmental Management Agency, the Zimbabwe Energy Regulatory Authority and Government representatives. 

“Hydronax proposes to install and maintain 100MW solar farm in the first phase and also install a 20MW green hydrogen production facility by 2026 with a production of up to 3 000 tonnes of green hydrogen per year and it would first of its kind in Zimbabwe,” said Dr Mabhurukwa. 

“The first and direct benefit of this power project is that it will cover the current electricity power deficits, instantly freeing up the foreign currency demand which Government was using.” 

Dr Mabhurukwa said once the demand for power was met, part of a bigger plan was to help grow mining into a US$2 billion industry by 2023, according to Government’s vision.

Hydronax chief executive Ms Victoria Walker who is based in the United Kingdom said the diaspora community must come together and change Africa as the trusted sustainability partner creating valued, single-sourced, efficient energy solutions delivered with passion, expertise, teamwork and relentless focus on high quality.

“The two projects both combined will create 800 to 900 employees and a policy to employ staff by proximity of their location to employment site will be actively pursued,” Ms Walker said. 

Speaking on the sidelines of the conference, the director of energy conservation and renewable energy in the Ministry of Energy and Power Development Dr Sosten Ziuku said Government welcomed projects of this nature as they dovetailed with Vision 2030.

“We view this an opportunity to combine a solar power generation in production of green hydrogen,” he said. “Green hydrogen is very essential, a new topic and a very good source of energy that is being talked about throughout the world.”

Dr Ziuku said in order to produce green hydrogen, it was essential that a project of this nature was located close to a water source.

“As Government, we have been developing lot of infrastructure in terms of dams,” he said. “We do have Kariba dam. Currently we have the Gwayi-Shangani which will be completed very soon, so a project of this nature would require that potential sites for generating hydrogen are close to large scales of water.” 

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