Women with disabilities strive for inclusion Mrs. Joyce Matara, the acting director of the National Association of Societies for the Care of the Handicapped (NASCOH), addressing a disability workshop in Harare recently.

Peter Tanyanyiwa Herald Correspondent

In Zimbabwe, the inclusion of women with disabilities is a critical component in achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

This is why President Emmerson Mnangagwa has reiterated the nation’s commitment to inclusivity, and his mantra of leaving no one behind sums it all up very well.

However, despite the nation’s efforts to address issues affecting people with disabilities, they continue to face significant challenges, including exclusion from accessing some opportunities and services.

The intersectionality between gender and disability, coupled with cultural norms and structural barriers, has perpetuated the widespread exclusion of women with disabilities.

Mrs Joyce Matara, the acting director of the National Association of Societies for the Care of the Handicapped (NASCOH), highlighted this.

“Women with disabilities are often prevented from participating in community activities and assuming leadership roles,” she said.

Precious Chakuma, Programmes Manager for Deaf Women Included

Ms Precious Chakuma, Programmes Manager for Deaf Women Included, emphasised the urgent need to equip women with disabilities with knowledge about their rights and leadership skills.

She stressed the importance of adopting a collective approach to disability issues.

“Only through collective efforts can a disability-inclusive society be built, where women with disabilities are considered full citizens and enjoy the same human rights as everyone else,” she said.

The limited implementation of policies have hindered the empowerment of women with disabilities and prevented them from realising their full potential.

It is evident that more programs targeting women are needed to address the root causes of the challenges they are facing and enable their active participation in society.

This entails not only raising awareness but also equipping women with disabilities with the necessary tools, skills and opportunities to lead and participate in their communities.

You Might Also Like

Comments