Tanzania threatens to de-register churches who rap president from pulp

President Magufuli

President Magufuli

DAR ES SALAAM. – Tanzania has threatened to revoke the registration of religious organisations that “mix religion and politics” after a cleric criticised President John Magufuli’s leadership in a Christmas sermon.

Opposition leaders in Tanzania say tolerance for dissent has been rapidly disappearing since President Magufuli took office in late 2015 with pledges to reform East Africa’s third-biggest economy and crack down on large-scale corruption. Tanzania’s constitution protects freedom of worship, but religious organisations must register at the country’s Home Affairs Ministry to get a license to operate legally.

“Recently, some leaders of (religious) societies have been using their sermons to analyse political issues, which is contrary to the law,” the permanent secretary in the Ministry of Home Affairs, Projest Rwegasira, said late on Thursday. Any violation of the law could lead to cancellation of the registration of the concerned religious society,” he said in a statement.

The warning was issued just days after the head of a Pentecostal church in the commercial capital Dar es Salaam criticised President Magufuli’s leadership, saying his government was closing democratic space.

Zachary Kakobe, self-proclaimed bishop and founder of the Full Gospel Bible Fellowship Church, accused the Tanzanian government of “quietly turning the country into a one-state rule by systematically banning political activity.”

The Home Affairs Ministry responded by issuing a public notice to religious organisations after the ruling Chama Cha Mapinduzi (CCM) party accused Kakobe of mixing religion and politics.

Tanzanian police banned political protests and rallies indefinitely in June last year, saying political activity would only be allowed during elections. President Magufuli, nicknamed “the Bulldozer” for pushing through his policies, has won some praise from Western donors for an anti-corruption campaign and cuts to wasteful public spending.

But opponents accuse him of increasingly undermining democracy by curbing dissent and stifling free speech. President Magufuli has publicly denied the allegations, saying he is no dictator. But several newspapers have been shut and more than a dozen suspects prosecuted for allegedly insulting the president via WhatsApp and other social media platforms.

The CCM won 42 of 43 local government elections in November, prompting the main opposition parties to announce a boycott of several parliamentary by-elections early next year, citing foul play. Smaller opposition parties will participate in the polls. - Reuters

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  • Almost Uhuru

    What happened to freedoms of speech, worship and association? The government should not decide what preachers say or what journalists write. Why do they not simply sponsor churches that boot-lick them rather than muzzle those who are critical. Magufuli is simply losing it.

  • Gold Ruyondo

    When he started sacking public servant unceremoniously he was cheered,but the wise so the wrong motives in him,wait and you are going to see the true African political monster