Trio in court over  proof of payment fraud Comfort Tanaka Gutu (28) appeared before Harare magistrate Mrs Marehwanazvo Gofa, charged with fraud. 

Prosper Dembedza 

Herald Correspondent 

THREE men from Harare yesterday appeared in court on allegations of forging World Remit proof of payment messages which they used to buy various goods. 

Wayne Phraser (21), Keith Chimulambe (20) and Tanatswa Rugare (21) were facing five counts of fraud when they appeared before Harare magistrate Mr Dennis Mangosi. 

They were released on US$100 bail each and will be back in court on May 23. 

It is the State’s case that on May 12, 2024, the accused persons went to Mr Owen Zandoga’s work place at corner Albion and Kaguvi Street and inquired about a 24 volts 100AH solar battery. 

Later that day, Mr Zandoga got in touch with the trio and they opted to pay for the solar battery using World Remit.

A World Remit proof of payment for US$520 was sent to Mr Zandoga and the complainant was advised to deliver the solar battery at Highland Park in Highlands, Harare. 

When Mr Zandoga went to collect the money sent by the suspected fraudsters at World Remit, he was told that the proof of payment does not exist and was fake. 

He then made a police report and a trap was set leading to the arrest of Phraser and Chimulambe when they wanted to collect the battery. 

The court heard that on May 11, 2024, the suspects went to Mr Blessing Makoni’s work place and inquired about a 370 litre Hisense refrigerator.  On the same day they got in touch with Mr Makoni and paid for the refrigerator using World Remit.

It is alleged that a World Remit proof of payment for US$495 was sent to Mr Makoni who was advised to deliver the fridge at Highland Park in Highlands. 

When the complainant went to collect the money at World Remit, he was told that the proof of payment does not exist and was fake. 

The fridge was recovered loaded in Rugare’s motor vehicle.

 In another incident which occurred on April 24 2024, the accused persons went to corner Albion and Kaguvi Street and inquired about an HP 15 laptop. On the same day they got in touch with the complainant and opted to pay for the laptop using World Remit.

 A proof of payment for US$650 was sent to the complainant who was advised to deliver the laptop at Highland Park in Highlands, which he did.

The court heard that when the complainant went to collect the money sent by alleged fraudsters at World Remit, he was told that the proof of payment does not exist and was fake.

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