Men’s health: A taboo subject?

Dr Sekai Nzenza WHEN the men in our village get sick, they do not go to the clinic until we force them to get into a wheel barrow or a scotch cart. By that time, they are too ill to resist. That is w...

Age and the cycle of life

Sekai Nzenza The retired policeman in the village next to ours has dementia, the disease that makes you lose your memory. He cannot remember a lot of what happened today or yesterday. MuBhunu is his ...

Lobola and the meaning of marriage

In the old days, long before the white man came, roora, lobola, dowry or bridal wealth was paid by use of a hoe made from iron smelted in the Hwedza mountains by the Mbire people. That was long befor...

A spiritual return to the soil

Sekai Nzenza My cousin Piri wants to move out of the city and work on a farm. Recently she found out that some new farmers’ wives are too busy at the office and at church. They do not have time to go...

Missionaries, education in colonial times

Sekai Nzenza IN the dry season, long before the missionaries arrived in this country, the elders always gathered for the bira, an all night ceremony to honour the spirits of our ancestors. Although m...

Music, the experiences of our people

I WAS not the only one who danced to the songs by the Bhundu Boys in a Harare bar in Glen Norah B last Sunday. The songs were filled with past memories, forcing you to dance as if you were back in th...

Of witches and wizards

TSIKAMUTANDA witch hunters are on their way to our village. A few weeks ago, somewhere along the Save River, they found many witches and wizards in possession of  various gnome-like creatures called ...

The colonial cemetery, our troubled history

Sekai Nzenza TODAY, I did not go into the busy Mupedzanhamo market with Piri and her business partner Chandi. Instead, I have taken a walk in the Mbare’s Pioneer Cemetery, which is just opposite the ...

A return to laughter

IT is Sunday afternoon and I am trying to write something good, interesting and inspiring for this column. But I am struggling to do so because in the next room, the noise of the blaring television a...

A cry for lost manhood

My cousin Piri and I heard that the mulberries were in abundance at  the village compound of Jemba and his sister-in-law Mai Esinati. When we  arrived at Jemba’s house, only a few kilometres from our...

African beauty and the shades of blackness

Sekai Nzenza MY eleven-year-old niece Edna came home from school crying. Some kid called her “Sudan”, meaning she was very black. This was not the first time Edna had been called names like that. Edn...

Surviving the stigma of HIV and Aids

“IF I HAD education, like a degree or something and I was not HIV positive, I would have taken that cousin of yours. Reuben, that one, I tell you, he is a man among men,” said Chandisaita. She said t...